Waka Table

Tue Dec. 8th 2015

Water is the basis of my design and this is something that people from any culture values and is a resource that brings everyone together.

First we have the space ‘Wairaka’, this represents the spring, water, movement, gathering and collaboration, bringing people together.

Then we move into the ‘Mataatua’ space which represents transition, flowing from open social space through to the focused quiet area. ‘Mataatua’ also represents teamwork and knowledge which is where computer areas are introduced and spaces for smaller group work to be carried out. 

Design Statement:

The inspiration for the interior planning and design proposal stems from the story of the Wairaka spring which originates on the Unitec Carrington Campus and within close proximity of where the ‘Hub’ development is going ahead.

Water is the basis of my design and this is something that people from any culture values and is a resource that brings everyone together.

The Te Aranga design principles that I have focused on are:

Whakapapa - Maori names are celebrated.

I have brought this principle into the design by breaking down the learning commons into 3 areas and each of the area is named after the Maori figure the space represents.

First we have the space ‘Wairaka’, this represents the spring, water, movement, gathering and collaboration, bringing people together.

Then we move into the ‘Mataatua’ space which represents transition, flowing from open social space through to the focused quiet area. ‘Mataatua’ also represents teamwork and knowledge which is where computer areas are introduced and spaces for smaller group work to be carried out.

Finally we arrive in the ‘Muriwai’ space. This is an area for more solitary focused study within acoustic designed pods.

Mahi Toi - Iwi/Hapu narratives are captured and expressed creatively and appropriately.

The story of how Wairaka came to be in Auckland from Whakatane and how she stamped her foot and demanded water to create ‘Te Wai Unuroa o Wairaka’ – The long drink of Wairaka.

Wairaka journeyed from Whakatane on the Mataatua Waka with her Uncle Puhi leading the waka and her Aunt Muriwai. This is where the names of the areas derives from; Wairaka – the spring, Mataatua – the waka and Muriwai of the cave.

Tohu - Mana Whenua significant sites and cultural landmarks are acknowledged.

My main point of inspiration is the Wairaka spring and stream which originate on and flow through the Unitec grounds and felt like an important part of the site that should be brought through into the building and into the design.

My design proposal is very much based on the natural colours and materials that can be seen around the spring. The water in the colours of the space and how the areas flow into one another. The transition space designed and coloured to feel like a river bed with banks of land and the carpet design to show the stream. The destination is the ‘Cave’ of Muriwai which features acoustic undulated panels with a dark screen fabric finish which are fixed to cut out patterned timber panels that allow light through the top of the cave.